Thursday, August 27, 2015

New Registration Process Instructions

Effective November 2015

MFA REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS
How To Register Yourself For Classes Through the Student Portal

1. After receiving the quarterly Class Schedule email from Beth (the winter quarter email will be sent November 9), reply to that email to inform Beth that you wish to register yourself, and list the classes you are tentatively planning to enroll in. It’s no problem to make class changes later; Beth just needs an idea of the coursework you’ll be taking (advisor contact is a university requirement for student self-registration). After receiving your email, Beth will enable your portal for registration

NOTE: Emails will only be sent to Lionmail (you can forward Lionmail to a personal email account if you prefer—forwarding instructions are available HERE). 

EXCEPTION: Newly accepted students who do not yet have a Lionmail account will receive the class schedule email at their personal email address for their first quarter only, and Beth will handle initial registration for their first quarter; portals will then be enabled for any schedule changes. 

2. Wait until the first day of registration to attempt to enroll yourself in classes (for winter, registration opens on November 16 at 7am CST).

3. When registration opens, log in to your Student Portal. Be sure to choose the correct term for registration (to register for Winter 2016 classes, choose term WIN QTR 16).

4. In the left column, click on UNOFFICIAL REGISTRATION. (If you are in the wrong term when you click this link, or if you click this link before you email Beth to have your portal enabled for registration, you will receive an error message.)

5. To filter course offerings, click on SHOW FILTER. In the DEPARTMENT field, enter IMF to list all MFA classes. On-campus students can filter further by entering 80 in the SECTION field.

6. Click on the box by the online class (3 credit hours) or on-campus cluster (9 credit hours) you’d like to enroll in. It will be added to your schedule at the top of the page. Continue to click the box next to any additional classes. 

7. When all classes have been added to your schedule, click PROCESS REGISTRATION to save your schedule, then click OK to complete enrollment.

8. You can make schedule changes in your student portal through the end of open enrollment (for winter quarter, enrollment ends December 18). To drop a class, follow the registration instructions above, and then click the box next to that class in your schedule at the top of the page. To add a class, filter by IMF and click the box next to the class you want to add. Complete your registration as noted above. You can view your schedule at any time in your portal (be sure your portal is in the correct term).

PLEASE NOTE:
-When enrolling in an online class, be aware of multiple sections for classes. You may enroll in any section of a class, but all classes must have at least 5 students enrolled by the end of the registration period in order to be held. After section OL1 has at least five students, you may register for section OL2 (if a second section of that class is available). After OL2 has at least five students, you may register for OL3 if available. It is best to balance out the enrollment numbers across all sections of a class. If you want to be in the same class as a friend, make sure that you both choose the same section number.

-Classes are full at 14 students. If all sections of a class are full, you will not be able to enroll in that class unless a student drops. Since students can now enroll themselves, Beth cannot maintain wait lists or reserve any spots in classes, so students hoping to register for a full class will need to check the portal occasionally to see if a spot opens up. If a spot becomes available, a student can then add that class (through the end of open enrollment).

-Late Schedule Changes: If you wish to make a change to your schedule after open enrollment has ended, or after classes have started, you must email Beth to request in writing that she make the change. (Please note that Beth will be out of state and unavailable by email or phone from Dec. 24 through Jan. 3. Please make any class change decisions by the 23rd if at all possible. If you must request a change after that date, you will need to wait until Jan. 4 for Beth to assist you.)

-If you receive an error message and are not able to enroll yourself, make sure that you are in the correct term (WIN QTR 16 for winter), and that you have emailed Beth to enable your portal for self-registration. If you have done both of these things and still see an error, email your class choices and several back-up choices to Beth, and she will register you in available classes (in the order of emails received). If you are on Hold (see below), Beth will not be able to register you until the hold is removed in the system.

-If your account is on Business Hold due to an account balance, financial aid issue, or promissory note issue, the portal will not allow you to be registered. Contact the Business Office, and once your hold is removed, you will be able to enroll in classes. Separate emails (through Lionmail) will be sent to students on Business Hold to inform you of the hold and to give you contact information for Business Office representatives. If your account is on Academic Hold and will not allow you to register, email Beth.

REMINDER: Do not post in Blackboard until you are certain you want to remain in the class, to avoid a tuition charge for dropping after posting/attending. See the First Assignment for Online Classes for information about tuition refunds and the drop policy.

-If you prefer to have Beth register you for classes, rather than enroll yourself, you will respond to the Class Schedule email stating that you would like Beth to enroll you, and listing your class choices (including several back-up choices in case of full classes). Please note that Beth will register students who make this request in the order of emails received, and she will not be able to reserve spots in classes or create wait lists, since other students will be enrolling themselves. In addition, Beth has a committee meeting the morning of the first day of winter registration, so she will not be able to register you until after the meeting, which means classes will likely fill before then. The best option for enrolling in your preferred classes would be to respond right away to the Class Schedule email requesting to have your portal enabled, then logging in to your Student Portal as soon as registration opens, and enrolling yourself in classes.

-Newly accepted students who do not yet have Lionmail/Portal access will not be able to enroll themselves initially for their first quarter of classes. After receiving the Class Schedule email from Beth, they should reply with their preferred class choices along with several back-up choices. Once Admissions has notified Beth that a new student is fully admitted to the university and is ready to register, then Beth will take care of initial registration and will send a confirmation email. Then she will enable their portal for any schedule changes they would like to make before the open enrollment period ends. For their second quarter of classes, these students will then have the option to enroll themselves, following the registration instructions above.

-While the transition to a new registration process may take some adjustment, it will allow you to have more control over your class schedule for enrolling in preferred classes, as well as making schedule changes before the quarter begins. Please contact Beth with any questions or problems.

LU MFA Process Changes Effective November 2015

Read the important info below for changes in: 
  1. Email Correspondence
  2. Registration Process
  3. Teacher Grant Form Process
  4. Student/Alumni Publication Notifications

1.
NEW Requirement for Email Correspondence
Beginning in November, starting with Winter Quarter 2016 registration emails, MFA students will be required to use their Lionmail account for all university communication. Please note that your Lionmail can be forwarded to your personal email account if preferred—click HERE for instructions on forwarding your Lionmail. All emails from the Program Director will only be sent to Lionmail accounts beginning in November 2015. Please read the info linked below and contact Beth with any questions or problems.
NOTE: After completing your degree, the personal email that you used to apply to the MFA program will be used for alumni correspondence. If you would like to receive alumni correspondence at a different email, send that info to Beth at the end of your degree program. Newly accepted students: Allow one week after being enrolled in your first class before accessing Lionmail or the Student Portal. Beth will contact new students at personal emails until their Lionmail is activated.

2.
NEW Class Registration Process Beginning November 2015
NOTE: This is a brief summary; please also read the full Registration Instructions:


Beginning in November, for Winter Quarter 2016 registration, MFA students will have two options for registration:

Option 1:
This option is new and is recommended for registration beginning in November 2015: After receiving Beth’s quarterly Class Schedule email (to be sent on November 9 for winter registration), reply with your tentative class choices and state that you would like to enroll yourself in classes. Beth will then enable your portal for registration. Beginning at 7am CST on the first day of registration (November 16 for winter quarter), you will be able to register yourself. It is fine if you change your mind about the classes you would like to take, and you will also have the option of making changes to your schedule through the end of open enrollment. Read the full directions for registering yourself for classes HERE, then contact Beth with any questions. Note that if you are on a business hold or academic hold, the portal will not allow you to register until the hold is removed.

Option 2:
This is the process we have used in the past (but no longer includes reserving spots or wait lists): After receiving my Class Schedule email (to be sent on November 9 for winter registration), reply with your class choices, and I will enroll you in the order of emails received. IMPORTANT NOTE: Since MFA students will now be able to enroll themselves in classes (as soon as enrollment opens, after having contacted me to release their portal for registration), I will no longer be able to maintain wait lists, and I will no longer be able to hold spots in classes for students. If you ask me to register you, I will enroll you in the order of emails received, but classes may fill up with students who have registered themselves before I am able to enroll you. This means your best chance of enrolling in your preferred classes will be to register yourself. This also means that if you register yourself and a class is full, you will be able to check back during the time before the quarter starts, and if you see that a spot has opened up, you will be able to enroll yourself in that class (and you can drop classes until the end of the open enrollment period). NOTE: New students beginning their first quarter in the program will need to be enrolled by Beth initially, and then will have the option to enroll themselves in future quarters.

3.
NEW Process for Teacher Grant Forms Beginning November 2015
Beginning in November for Winter Quarter 2016, any students who are eligible to apply for the elementary/middle school/high school teacher grant will be responsible for filling out your own grant form (the form will be attached to the quarterly Class Schedule email from Beth). On the form, you will type in your info, including your classes for the quarter and your work email, and then you will email the completed form to Beth by the deadline given in the Class Schedule email. Students must complete and return your own form by the deadline EVERY QUARTER in order to be considered for the grant. Note that the form requires your official email address from the school where you teach. Contact Beth with any questions about this new process.

4.
NEW Process for Sharing Your Publications or Writing-Related Jobs
In 2016, Beth will post student and alumni bios (publications, teaching positions, writing-related jobs, links to personal websites, etc.) on the MFA website (current student info here and alumni info here). For the initial posting, Beth requests that alumni, along with any students who have this type of information to report (it’s fine to wait until after graduating if you prefer), please email bio information in the form of three to five bullet points to this email address:


(To see examples of the bullet point bio style we will use, visit the Faculty Bios page HERE.) 

After initial responses are posted, the webpages will be updated with new publication info approximately twice per year. Depending on the number of responses received, some bios may be featured directly on the page, while others may be linked on the page and posted in full on the blog.
  
Please do the following to share publications & related info to be featured on the Lindenwood website:
  • Email three to five bullet points with bio information (publications, teaching or writing-related jobs, links to personal websites or blogs) to LUmfaPublications@gmail.com by September 25 for initial inclusion on the website.
  • Alumni, please include the year you completed the program in your email. Current students, if you have information to submit while you are still a student in the program, include the year you expect to graduate from the program.
  • When you have new publications or other writing-related news in the future, email that info to LUmfaPublications@gmail.com to be included in the next website update. 
  • If you would also like your publications to be announced on Facebook, please email Mary Anderson (MAnderson@lindenwood.edu) and request that she post your good news on the Online|In-Class FB page. 

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

F15 First Assignment for Online Classes

Fall Quarter 2015 At A Glance:
Online Classes Ready for Student View: Sun. Oct. 4
Online Classes Officially Begin/First Post Due (for attendance): Mon. Oct. 5
Quarter End Date: Sat. Dec. 19
Final Grades Posted in Portal: Mon. Dec. 21 by 5pm

Important note for NEW students:
Once you are enrolled in classes, you should be able to access Lionmail and your Student Portal within about a week. You should try to access Lionmail, your Portal, and Blackboard before the quarter begins, and if you have any issues, please email Beth. Even though online class shells will not be ready for student view on Blackboard until October 4, you should try logging in the week before classes begin, to make sure you are able to access the site. Login instructions are linked at the bottom of this post. Contact Beth with any questions or problems.

First date that students may access classes on Blackboard: Sunday, October 4
MFA classes will be available to students to view on this day (class shells may appear in Blackboard before this date, but classes are not ready for student view until Sunday 10/4). On Sunday, you may look over assignments and class content to ensure that you wish to remain in the class. If you decide to drop the class, do NOT post in Blackboard at all, as that counts as attendance per university policy, and you would be charged a portion of tuition for dropping after attending/posting. To drop a class, email the program director at bmead@lindenwood.edu.

First assignment post (to confirm attendance) due date: Monday, October 5, by 11:59pm CST
This assignment simply requires you to post your name in the First Assignment discussion forum as verification to the instructor that you wish to remain in the class and be counted as attended for week 1. Instructors will enter first week attendance according to posts made by 11:59pm CST on Monday, October 5. If you post in the First Assignment forum by then, you will be marked as Present. If you do not post by then, you will be marked as Absent. Attendance must be entered early in week 1 due to university policy and because first day attendance impacts the refund process for financial aid and student loans. REMINDER: If you decide to drop the class, do NOT post in Blackboard at all, as that counts as attendance per university policy, and you would be charged a portion of tuition for dropping after attending/posting. To drop a class, email the program director at bmead@lindenwood.edu.

Class Requirements and other assignments due during Week 1 (Mon. October 5 - Sun. October 11: See Week 1 folder in Blackboard
Each instructor will have his or her own additional assignments due during Week 1. Along with posting your name in the First Assignment discussion forum to confirm that you wish to remain in the class, you must click on Class Requirements in the left menu column and thoroughly read all information contained there. Then you will click on the Week 1 folder to read instructions for the remaining coursework and due dates during Week 1. If you have any problems navigating through the class on Blackboard, contact your instructor or the program director (bmead@lindenwood.edu).

Weekly Coursework and Participation Requirements
Each week during the quarter, you will click on WEEKLY ASSIGNMENTS and then on the appropriate week’s folder to view the assignments and due dates for that week. You are required to participate on Blackboard a minimum of three times per week (on three separate days) for each class you are enrolled in. See Blackboard for detailed information on the attendance/participation policy and grading criteria. 

Note on texts: 
MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

Instructions for Logging in to Blackboard for Online Classes:

  • Go to www.lindenwood.edu
  • Hover your mouse over Blackboard in the white bar at the top of the screen
  • Click on Access Blackboard
  • Log in with the same user ID and password you use for your Lionmail account. If you have not activated your Lionmail account, go to www.lindenwood.edu, hover over Email at the top of the screen, and click on Find Your Username; follow the instructions to get your user ID and password. If you have any problems, email the director at bmead@lindenwood.edu or the Help Desk at helpdesk@lindenwood.edu
  • Once you are logged in, click on your course name to enter the class site
  • To access Blackboard resources, click on the online support links at the bottom of the Log In page, or click on the Help menu button in your class shell

F15 Literary Journal Production & Publication

IMF 55704 The Literary Journal: Production & Publication
Instructor: Beth Mead (bmead@lindenwood,edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description: 
It is highly recommended that all MFA students enroll in at least one Literary Journal class during the program. This class gives students the chance to be on the other side of the submission process and is very useful as a writer—and it also allows students to list an Editorial Assistant credit on their CV/resume. Students can enroll in three different journal editing classes during their time in the MFA program.
  
Students in literary journal classes read, discuss, and vote on submissions to The Lindenwood Review. This class includes other types of assignments (reader/writer aesthetic, literary journal presentation, and submitting one original piece to an approved journal), but it does not include a creative writing workshop. 
  
For fall quarter, students may request a primary genre for submission reading, but students will also read and vote on finalists from all genres for final publication decisions for issue 6. Students will also take part in proofreading, voting on ordering pieces in the journal, and voting on photographs for the cover and section headers. Feel free to contact Beth with any questions. 

Textbook:
Issue 5 of The Lindenwood Review
Please order the issue by mail if possible, at the reduced rate of $5, to help support the MFA program (online orders are available for $7 from the LU Spirit Shoppe but do not directly support our program). To order by mail, make your check payable to Lindenwood University and mail to: Beth Mead, The Lindenwood Review, 400 N. Kingshighway, St. Charles, MO 63301.

Additionally, students will purchase (or access online) one issue of an approved literary journal for class presentations.

F15 The Graphic Novel

IMF 54302 Genre Fiction as Literature: The Graphic Novel
Instructor: Zachary Vickers (zvickers@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description: 
In this course, we will take an introductory look at a unique form of literature: the graphic novel. Using three contemporary examples (specifically graphic memoir), we will examine the emotional weight of text and image--both separately and together--discuss how the text-image dynamic creates stunning, evocative, poignant, and beautiful renditions of the human experience, and debate how this hybrid form can or cannot serve as an elevated medium versus traditional prose or imagery.  
  
Textbooks:
1.
Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic 
Alison Bechdel
Mariner Books 2007 
9780618871711
2. 
Maus: A Survivor's Tale
Art Spiegelman
Penguin Books 2003
9780141014081
3.
Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood
Marjane Satrapi
Pantheon 2004
9780375714573

F15 Magical Realism Literature & Workshop

IMF 53702 Selected Emphases in Fiction: Magical Realism Literature & Workshop
Instructor: Eve Jones (ejones@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
Designed as "Version 2.0" of the original Magical Realism course, this literature and workshop course will continue to explore the definition and boundless possibilities of magical realism, still focused intently on "the mystery that breathes behind things." Using the same main text, Magical Realist Fiction, this course will include new/different readings and in-depth discussion, as well as a crucial workshop component, allowing students the opportunity to write their own magical realist work and present it for feedback. It is open to new students as well as those students previously enrolled in Magical Realism.
  
Magical realism is, more than anything else, an attitude toward reality that can be expressed in popular or cultured forms, in elaborate or rustic styles in closed or open structures. In magical realism the writer confronts reality and tries to untangle it, to discover what is mysterious in things, in life, in human acts. The principle thing is not the creation of imaginary beings or worlds but the discovery of the mysterious relationship between man and his circumstances. In magical realism key events have no logical or psychological explanation. The magical realist does not try to copy the surrounding reality or to wound it but to seize the mystery that breathes behind things.
  
Luis Leal, Magical Realism in Spanish American Literature. Magical Realism. Ed. Zamora and Faris
  
Textbook:
Magical Realist Fiction
David Young
Oberlin 1984
9780582284524
  

F15 Ekphrastic Poetry

IMF 52101 Focused Poetry Workshop: Ekphrastic Poetry Workshop
Instructor: Eve Jones (ejones@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
The line between visual art and writing is a wonderfully blurred thing. Traditional ekphrasis is the art of description: what does this painting look like in words? Writers across time and genre have confronted art with language. In this course we'll be reading, writing, and exploring ekphrastic poetry in a deeper, more individual sense: how can we face, respond to, and interpret a piece of visual art using words? What conversation can we have with it? In what way(s) is our literary response dependent on perception? We'll be examining an array of visual art (paintings, sculpture, etc.) and writing in response to each, and we'll be reading multiple examples of ekphrastic poetry, classical and contemporary, to broaden our understanding of its possibilities.
  
Textbook:
Art and Artists: Poems
Emily Fragos
Everyman's Library 2012
ISBN 9780307959386

F15 Narrative Journalism

IMF 56600 Narrative Journalism
Instructor: Tony D'Souza (adsouza@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
  
Narrative journalism is the art of telling a true story, weaving research and facts into an engaging, page-turning piece of non-fiction that reads with energy, insight and depth. Readers love non-fiction as a means to better understand the world and people different from them. The task of the narrative journalist is to paint accurate and vivid portraits of people and subjects even the journalist, at the beginning of the writing, may know little about.
  
Media is changing quickly with many new online platforms for publishing narrative journalism; in fact, narrative journalism may be enjoying is most vibrant period ever. We will look at a diverse sampling of long narrative non-fiction pieces from some of the leading outlets today, including The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Harper's, and Vanity Fair. We'll discuss how to achieve the 'holy grail' of the narrative journalist — writing a piece with "three-dimensionality" — as well as investigate how to balance primary and secondary sources, dialogue, interviews, and hard facts with the demands of story-telling. Students will have free range to investigate whatever subjects are dear to their own hearts while building strong foundations as narrative journalists in this field of writing where publishers are actively looking for new writers and content.
  
We’ll not only explore non-fiction writing and publishing for today’s world, but also ethics, craft, the submissions process and the social importance of it all. The ability to write narrative journalism greatly diversifies a writer's range and ability to answer the question, "How do I tell this true tale in a way that always brings the reader along?"
  
No Textbook is required for this class. 
  

F15 Flash Nonfiction

IMF 52301 Focused Nonfiction Workshop: Flash Nonfiction
Instructor: Mary Anderson (manderson@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
Philip Graham, the co-founder and nonfiction editor of Ninth Letter Arts and Literary Journal, writes: “The memories we have of our lives are not a continuous narrative. Instead, they are more akin to the several arcs of a skipping stone. . .” He goes on to suggest that rather than having a beginning and end, flash nonfiction has a point of entry and a point of departure. Today, this is what we want to read and so, this is what we want to write!

Phillip Lopate suggests flash nonfiction essays offer “ …the paradoxical effect of slowing down our attention and encouraging an expansion of the moment…” Come practice and experience this emerging and popular brief essay form, the perfect medium for experimentation, insight, and illumination!
  
Textbook:
The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction: Advice and Essential Exercises from Respected Writers, Editors, and Teachers
Dinty W. Moore
Rose Metal Press 2012
9780984616664
  

F15 Flash Fiction

IMF 52202 Focused Fiction Workshop: Flash Fiction
Instructor: Kelli Allen (kallen@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
A piece of flash fiction is often explained as a story that has been “boiled down to its essential parts.” A flash story frequently depends on a fragment, a single hinging line, or a series of images to capture an entire narrative in less than 1000 words. In this course, we will read some fantastic examples of powerful flash, quiet flash, and flash that works its way into your skin through its language and oddity. We will write every class meeting and we will workshop in every class. Our goal is to create our own pieces of flash fiction with the guidance of one another and from the examples presented through our readings and prompts. We will do more with fewer words. We will give narrative new meaning and direction by focusing on how to impart all the emotion, energy, and poetics of longer prose into a smaller frame. The pieces written in this course will range from 25, to 50, to 250, to 500, and to 1000 words. Our stories will sometimes be sharp, and sometimes strive for elegance. Everything is fair game. Ultimately, the goal is to inspire one another to craft unique and vital works of fiction that are meant to be consumed in a single excited gulp.
  
Textbooks:
1.
Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Fiction
Tara Masih
Rose Metal Press 2009
9780978984861
2.
New Sudden Fiction: Short-Short Stories
Robert Shapard & James ThomasWW Norton 2007
9780393328011

F15 Literary Novel Draft Workshop

IMF 57402: The Literary Novel: Literary Novel Draft Workshop
Instructor: Wm Anthony Connolly (wconnolly@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
This online workshop helps you develop your in-progress literary novel from exploring structure in all its potential: examining the novel’s voice, viewpoint, and characterization, and the novel’s language. A literary novel is a work of long prose that concerns itself less with plot, but more with character, the character’s inner world, and the uses of language to bring character and world alive. A literary novel is a type of long fiction, much like fantasy, horror, supernatural, science fiction, etc., are examples of another exclusive long form prose type—the genre novel. As such, fantasy, horror, supernatural, and science fiction are not literary because they work on developing plot and conventions of its genre. Literary novels tend to move at a slower pace than genre novels and are marked by elevated language. This is not a genre novel class. (If you’re uncertain what kind of novel you’re working on—literary or genre —it’s best to email the instructor and ask. The instructor has had both literary and genre novels published.) The course assignments include writing scenes using characters and situations from the in-progress novel, polishing existing sections or chapters, and discussion of your in-progress work. Every week your work will be submitted to a workshop for feedback from both your peers and your instructor. The workshop environment can be a demanding one, but it’s meant to improve submitted work. You will be asked to comment and critique the work of others; others will critique and comment on your work, all with the goal of improving your in-progress literary novel. Your goal is to complete 50 well-crafted pages of a novel.
  
No Textbook is required for this class. 

F15 Fiction Craft & Workshop

IMF 51602 Fiction Genres: Fiction Craft & Workshop
Instructor: David Hollingsworth (dhollingsworth@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
This course is focused on workshopping original pieces of fiction.  It is also an exploration of the intricacies of fiction writing, from character and plot to effective description and dialogue.   The techniques explored in class can help writers to develop work that is complete in all areas, firm in foundation, and  necessarily concise.   Students will submit a story for workshop and will be expected to provide constructive and careful feedback for others.
  
Textbook:
By Cunning and Craft: Sound Advice and Practical Wisdom for Fiction Writers
Peter Selgin
Writer's Digest Books 2007
9781582974910

F15 The Rockstar Poets & Writers

IMF 52102 Focused Poetry Workshop: The Rockstar Poets & Writers
Instructor: Julia Gordon-Bramer (jbramer@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
Poets have inspired musicians since the earliest times, and rock musicians are no exception. Bands like Rush have filled lyrics with references to Cervantes' Don Quixote; a lot of Iron Maiden's work draws upon Edgar Allen Poe. The Doors' Jim Morrison might have been said to take on Rimbaud's entire persona, poet blouse and all, while phrasing Hart Crane in "Riders on the Storm." Indie singer-songwriter Elliott Smith once fronted a punk band using the name "Johnny Panic," a nod to Sylvia Plath's short story collection, Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams (and we see her term, "Bled White," from "Dialogue over a Ouija Board," in Smith's song with that title). This class will look at rock bands across the generations, from the 1960s to the present, comparing lyrics of famous musical works to those first seminal poems. Then, turning things around, we will use some musical works as jumping off places for our own original poetry. 

No Textbook is required for this class.

F15 Adv Studies in Craft of Poetry

IMF 52900 Adv Studies in Craft of Poetry
Instructor: Catherine Rankovic (crankovic@lindenwood.edu)
Start Date: October 5
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for Blackboard login and first post instructions.

Instructor's Course Description:
I’d subtitle this course “How to Improve Your Poetry,” or “How to Create Poems that Move Your Readers.” After writing your first draft, which is like a pencil sketch, optimize your poem using classic and modern poetic techniques to create a memorable full-color experience for your reader. The poets who move you have skills, nerve, and techniques; you can be like them. Feedback and revision will support you in acquiring the ability to write poems of consistent quality. You will also learn the lingo. If you don’t know what syllabics or enjambments are, you will learn. Poetry exercises will encourage you to free your imagination. 
  
Textbooks:
1. 
The Poetry Home Repair Manual
Ted Kooser
Bison Books 2007
9780803259782
2. 
Creating Poetry
John Drury
Writer's Digest Books 2006
9781582974637

F15 Prose Cluster

ON-CAMPUS CLUSTER (9 credit hours)
The Prose Cluster: Fiction & Creative Nonfiction
Instructor: Andrew Pryor (apryor@lindenwood.edu)
Meets: Tuesday nights 6-10pm beginning September 29 in the LUCC Conference Room
   
Course Descriptions: 
IMF 52200 Focused Fiction Workshop (3): This course is a discussion of original short fiction. Students simultaneously increase their proficiency as fiction writers and deepen their critical responses to the work of their peers. 
IMF 52300 The Nonfiction Workshop (3): This course is a discussion of original nonfiction pieces, focusing primarily on the personal narrative form. Students will focus on incorporating personal experience and both narrative and lyrical elements into a nonfiction piece. As this workshop is paired with a fiction workshop, students will also focus on bringing traditional fiction writing techniques into their nonfiction writing, such as characterization, setting, and dialog.
IMF 55600 The Prose Collection (3): This course is a survey of major fiction and nonfiction writers, as well as an exploration of writing techniques that are unique to and shared by both forms. Reading and discussions will focus on use of common writing techniques, such as creating scene, narrative persona, and theme. 

Textbooks:
1.
On Writing Short Stories
Tom Bailey, ed.
Oxford University Press 2010
9780195395655
2.
Tell It Slant
Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paola
McGraw-Hill 2012
9780071781770

First Assigment (Due Tues. Sept. 29): 

Exercise 1 – Characterization
This is an assignment in three parts.

First read the stories "Everything That Rises Must Converge" by Flannery O'Connor and Raymond Carver's "The Cathedral" in our textbook (On Writing Short Stories).  While reading, pay particular attention to places where characters are developed through observation.

Next, take your notebook and go to a place where you can observe people—a library, restaurant, bus station, wherever.  Choose a few people and describe them in detail in your notebook.  What are they wearing?  What are they doing and why do you think they’re doing it?  If they’re talking, can you overhear (or guess) what they’re saying?  What they are thinking?

Finally, choose one character and invent a life for him or her.  Write for 2–3 pages.  Where does s/he live?  Work?  What relationships does s/he have?  Worries?  Fears?  Desires?  Pleasures?  Does this character have a secret?  Do you find yourself beginning a story?

For the first day of class, come prepared to discuss "Everything That Rises Must Converge," "The Cathedral," and your writing exercise.  You will need to turn in a typed copy of your exercise at the end of class.

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).


Fall Quarter 2015 At A Glance:
On-Campus Cluster Start Date/First Assignment Due: Tue. Sept. 29
Quarter End Date: Sat. Dec. 19
Final Grades Posted in Portal: Mon. Dec. 21 by 5pm

Fall 2015 Class Schedule

Click class titles for instructor course descriptions and textbook info. 

ON-CAMPUS CLUSTER (9 credit hours):
The Prose Cluster: Fiction & Creative Nonfiction
Andrew Pryor
Tuesdays starting September 29
LUCC Conference Room

ONLINE CLASSES (3 credit hours each):
All online classes begin October 5.
Read the full First Assignment for Online Classes post for instructions on the first required post and Blackboard login instructions.

Adv Studies in Craft of Poetry--Catherine Rankovic
The Rockstar Poets & Writers--Julia Gordon-Bramer
FULL Ekphrastic Poetry--Eve Jones
FULL Fiction Craft & Workshop--David Hollingsworth
Literary Novel Draft Workshop--Wm Anthony Connolly
FULL Flash Fiction--Kelli Allen
Flash Nonfiction--Mary Anderson
Narrative Journalism--Tony D'Souza
FULL Magical Realism Literature & Workshop--Eve Jones
Genre Fiction as Literature: The Graphic Novel--Zachary Vickers
The Literary Journal: Production & Publication (for TLR issue 6)--Beth Mead
     NOTE: It is recommended that all MFA students take at least one section of The Literary Journal during their time in the program, as it is a valuable opportunity for writers to experience the other side of the submissions process. Students may take up to three sections total of The Literary Journal.

GRADUATE THESIS:
If Fall Quarter is your final quarter in the program, you must include in your registration email that you wish to be enrolled in the thesis for fall. If you would like to request a specific midterm reader, include your request in your registration email. Read the full thesis guidelines HERE


INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITY: 
Deadline: Writing sample must be received by Beth no later than Wednesday morning (8/19).
Please check your email for an internship opportunity (creative nonfiction blogging for The Art of Women Foundation) for 6 credit hours for fall quarter. Interested students should email Beth with a brief creative nonfiction writing sample to apply for this internship. Up to four students will be accepted for this exciting opportunity for our writers. This internship is open to all LU MFA students, whether on-campus or fully online (out-of-state) students.


NOTE to MFA students: Beth will email you by the end of this week (8/14) with class details and registration information. Then you will email her your class choices. Beth will register students (in the order of emails received) by the end of next week (8/21).