Tuesday, May 12, 2015

SMR15 Blackboard Login Instructions

IMPORTANT NOTES:
Do not log into your class shells until Sunday, July. Summer classes are not ready to be viewed by students until that date. However, it is fine for new students to log into Blackboard before that date (without clicking on individual class links listed after logging in) to make sure they can access Blackboard.

Read the full Online First Assignment post thoroughly HERE.

Instructions for Logging in to Blackboard for Online Classes:
  • Go to www.lindenwood.edu
  • Hover your mouse over Blackboard in the white bar at the top of the screen
  • Click on Access Blackboard
  • Log in with the same user ID and password you use for your Lionmail account. If you have not activated your Lionmail account, go to www.lindenwood.edu, hover over Email at the top of the screen, and click on Find Your Username; follow the instructions to get your user ID and password. If you have any problems, email the director at bmead@lindenwood.edu or the Help Desk at helpdesk@lindenwood.edu
  • Once you are logged in, click on your course name to enter the class site
  • To access Blackboard resources, click on the online support links at the bottom of the Log In page, or click on the Help menu button in your class shell


If you have any problems, email Beth at bmead@lindenwood.edu

Monday, May 11, 2015

SMR15 MFA Thesis

Thesis students will first log into Blackboard during the week of July 13. Please note that the Blackboard class shell will not be ready for student view until that date.

To enroll in the thesis, list the thesis in your email to Beth along with your summer class requests for registration.

If you wish to request a specific thesis midterm reader (one of your previous MFA instructors), you must make the request by email to Beth, who will then contact the instructor to see if he or she would be available to be a reader for summer quarter. If you have no preference, a midterm reader will be assigned to you based on instructor availability. Beth is the final reader for all theses at the end of the quarter to give final approval and cannot serve as a midterm reader.

Read the full THESIS GUIDELINES HERE. You will log into Blackboard once per week to help keep you on track as you work independently on your thesis throughout the quarter. Your first journal entry discussing your thesis concept will be due in Blackboard by Sunday, July 19. Looking ahead, the date that you will email the midterm draft/portion of your thesis to Beth (who will then forward your draft to your assigned midterm reader for feedback) is August 23, and your final thesis document, including your introductory essay, must be emailed to Beth by September 20. All details and additional requirements (journal entries, program survey, etc.) are posted in the weekly folders in Blackboard. Contact Beth with any questions about the thesis process.

NOTE: 
If you have not yet completed the top portion of the degree application form and returned it to Beth, you must do so immediately, since the deadline has passed for September degree completion. Once you have emailed (scan or clear photo) or mailed this form to Beth, it will be submitted with a policy exemption to request approval to apply after the deadline. 

SMR15 The Literary Journal

The Literary Journal
Three sections available for summer:
IMF 55701 The Literary Journal: Fiction
IMF 55702 The Literary Journal: Poetry
IMF 55703 The Literary Journal: Prose Poetry

Instructor: Beth Mead
BMead@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Students enrolled in summer journal editing classes will read submissions to issue 6 of The Lindenwood Review, discuss them with the class, and vote on them for publication; students will be listed as editorial assistants in TLR. Students in the Prose Poetry class will help determine the winner of the Prose Poetry Contest. (Summer journal editing classes will cover submissions received from June through August; fall journal editing classes will include submissions of personal essays, fiction, and poetry received from September through November.) Additional coursework includes describing and analyzing your personal aesthetic as a reader and writer (to clarify your perspective as you vote on submissions), as well as researching and presenting a literary journal to the class (students enrolled in more than one section will research a different journal for each class). In addition, the publication process will be discussed, and students will be required to submit their own original work to an approved publication by the end of the quarter. Students may enroll in up to four sections of journal editing classes during their time in the program, but it is recommended that no more than two sections are taken in a single quarter.

TEXTBOOK:
Issue 5 of The Lindenwood Review
Please order the issue by mail if possible, at the reduced rate of $5, to help support the MFA program (online orders are available for $7 here from the bookstore but do not support our program). To order by mail, make your check payable to Lindenwood University and mail to: Beth Mead, The Lindenwood Review, 400 N. Kingshighway, St. Charles, MO 63301. 

Additionally, students will purchase (or access online) one issue of an approved literary journal for class presentations.

SMR15 Focused Scriptwriting Workshop

Focused Scriptwriting Workshop (workshop)
IMF 52400 Focused Scriptwriting Workshop

Instructor: Zachary Vickers
ZVickers@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Focused Scriptwriting will isolate narrative elements through the construction of high-quality scenes. The course will look at examples of scene from film, focusing on the development of character, setting, tone, subtext, and other important elements. We will also discuss how to show and tell simultaneously—creating visual subtext as well as traditional subtext via dialogue in order to create efficient and urgent moments while moving the story forward. Students will also be expected to write their own scenes—whether self-contained shorts, or a scene for something larger—which will then be workshopped and revised.

TEXTBOOK:
Screenplay: The Foundations of Scriptwriting
Syd Field
Delta 2005
ISBN 9780385339032

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 The Prose Collection: David Foster Wallace

The Prose Collection: David Foster Wallace (literature)
IMF 55603 The Prose Collection: David Foster Wallace

Instructor: Kelli Allen
KAllen@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In David Foster Wallace’s Consider the Lobster and Other Essays we will learn why there is gravitas in the porn industry’s annual awards banquet, why Kafka was secretly hilarious, what really happens when we cook a lobster, and how John McCain’s passion for politics is strangely, violently tender, among other oddities and profundities. We will explore the magic of the extended footnote and what it means to let poetry into journalism and essay. This particular collection of essays offers a fractaled glimpse into the creative process and observations employed by arguably the most exciting nonfiction/fiction writer of a generation. DFW tells us “The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways, every day.” It is this freedom that he longs for in his essays, and the freedom he hopes to offer through exposing some of the weirdest, most vital aspects of being alive in a community of equally bizarre and fragile humans. In this course we will examine the universe through DFW’s lenses and then apply our own in mini-workshops and discussion. The ride will be fast, and strange, and sometimes very, very difficult (footnotes galore), but worth every moment.

TEXTBOOK:
Consider the Lobster
David Foster Wallace
Bay Back Books 2007
ISBN 9780316013321

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 The Personal Essay

The Personal Essay (craft/workshop)
IMF 54600 The Personal Essay

Instructor: David Hollingsworth
DHollingsworth@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will focus on the wellspring of memory and reflection and the employment of narrative in creative nonfiction. Students will discuss a variety of personal essays, noting the use of voice, character development, sense of place and time, and narrative arc, and will write their own creative nonfiction pieces for workshop.

TEXTBOOK:
Tell It Slant
Miller and Paola
McGraw-Hill
9780071781770

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 The Lyric Essay

The Lyric Essay (craft/workshop)
IMF 54700 The Lyric Essay

Instructor: Eve Jones
EJones@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Just when you think that you, reader or writer, have a handle on what the lyric essay is, it slips away and turns into something else. Meet it for coffee when it's prose, but understand it's also having a drink with someone else across the street as poetry. Here is what you know for sure: it's honest, it's true, it's surprising, its hair is a little messy, it is at once lyrically gorgeous and precisely organized, and it prefers the scenic route through the body, the past, the self, the external world. Examples of challenging & excellent contemporary lyric essayists include Anne Carson, Michael Ondaatje, Sarah Manguso, and John D'Agata.

TEXTBOOK:
Writing Creative NonFiction
Carolyn Forche and Philip Gerard
Story Press 2001
ISBN 9781884910500

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 The Prose Collection: Henry Miller

The Prose Collection: Henry Miller (literature)
IMF 55604 The Prose Collection: Henry Miller

Instructor: Kelli Allen
KAllen@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In considering what it means to be a writer in a world ever more concerned with itself as a populace of individuals bent on moving as a whole, where and how do we find our “voice?” Henry Miller, in his stunning collection of essays and stories, Stand Still Like The Hummingbird, suggests that only “the artist has the power to open man up, to set free the imagination? The others—priest, teacher, saint, statesman, warrior—hold us to the path of history. They keep us chained to the rock, that the vultures may eat out our hearts. It is the artist who has the courage to go against the crowd; he is the unrecognized "hero of our time"—and of all time.” Miller asserts that it is only through language that we learn to recognize ourselves as heroic, as worthy of attention on the page. This course will take a close, critical look at how Miller structures his own art and how he found the courage to express his opinions on modern art, on the classics, on love, money, sex, and the art of storytelling. You will be asked to compose two literary essays of your own which will be workshopped during the quarter. We will discuss material and topics that will sometimes feel difficult and controversial. Come into this course space open and ready for lively and vital conversation. 

TEXTBOOK:
Stand Still Like the Hummingbird
Henry Miller
New Directions 1962
ISBN 9780811203227

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 Young Adult Fiction Workshop

Young Adult Fiction Workshop (workshop/craft)
IMF 54403 Genre Fiction Workshop: Young Adult Literature

Instructor: Mary Anderson
MAnderson@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This Young Adult Fiction Workshop launches from the banks of best-known favorites like Harry Potter and The Hunger Games. Using rough drafts of your novel chapters as our focus, we will explore—through discussions, journal revisions, and workshop critique—the ingredients that make your chapters YA, in terms of point of view, subject matter, and voice. You will write up to three chapters of an original YA or crossover novel along with a partial chapter outline for your book in progress. We will read excerpts from works by J.D. Salinger, J.K. Rowlings, Curtis Sittenfeld, Madeline L’Engle, and Scott Westerfeld. 

The best YA novels involve fully realized characters and a level of emotional complexity that appeal to today’s young person. You will attempt to conjure swiftly moving plots that speak to a teen’s unique world-view. Dare to invent a combination unlike anything already happening in literary fiction today.

TEXTBOOK:
The Complete Guide to Writing for Young Adults
Gabrielle Harbowy
Dragon Moon Press 2014
ISBN 9781897492819

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 Adv Studies in Contemporary Fiction

Adv Studies in Contemporary Fiction (craft/writing exercises)
IMF 53900 Advanced Studies in Contemporary Fiction

Instructor: Wm. Anthony Connolly
WConnolly@lindenwood.edu

NOTE: It is not required to have taken Fundamentals of Contemporary Fiction before enrolling in this class; however, it is a good follow-up class for those who have taken it.

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This eleven-week course is for the skilled fiction writer who wants to up their game. Each week the course will offer a new craft technique to produce prose with publication as the goal. Advanced Studies in Contemporary Fiction prepares students to work within historical and current creative writing practices and provides a supportive environment to refine their short stories, novellas or novels.

TEXTBOOK:
How Fiction Works
James Wood
Picador 2009
ISBN 9780312428471

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 Fiction Writing Workshop

Fiction Writing Workshop (workshop)
IMF 53500 Fiction Writing Workshop

Instructor: Tony D'Souza
ADSouza@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The blank page...what can be more terrifying for a writer? We all know the feeling of starting something new, of not knowing exactly where it is going to go. Isn't it nice to remember that every great work of literature began that same way?

In this workshop-driven fiction writing course, we will discuss process, technique tips, and share with one another what we do when we're staring at a blank page. Then we'll give each other feedback once we've begun to fill a few of them. This course is open to all styles of fiction, from literary, to speculative, to fast-paced genre. We'll read great short stories from Rick Moody, Vladimir Nabokov, Zora Neale Hurston and others. Ultimately, we want to show our fiction to the world and will work on writing query letters and figure out how to pitch to agents. It all starts the same way, so let's begin. 

NO TEXTBOOK IS REQUIRED FOR THIS WORKSHOP CLASS.

SMR15 Ariel & the Tarot

Ariel & the Tarot (literature/craft)
IMF 52703 Selected Emphases in Poetry: Later Ariel Poems & the Tarot

This class will cover the second half of Fixed Stars Govern a Life: Decoding Sylvia Plath, volume one, featuring Plath's Ariel poems #12 ("Elm") through 22 ("The Courage of Shutting-Up").

Instructor: Julia Gordon-Bramer
JBramer@lindenwood.edu

NOTE: There is no prerequisite for this class; it is open to both students who have taken Plath & the Tarot (studying earlier poems in Ariel) and to students who have not taken that class.

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is intended for students who seek to understand the meanings and structure of Sylvia Plath's Ariel poems; to understand, identify and interpret symbolism; and to gain an introductory knowledge of the basic tenets of tarot and mysticism in written creative expression. Students will have weekly written responses, class discussion, presentations and individual creative work inspired by Plath's mystic models.

TEXTBOOKS (2):
Fixed Stars Govern a Life: Decoding Sylvia Plath, volume I
Julia Gordon Bramer
Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2015
ISBN 9781622880645

Ariel: The Restored Edition
Sylvia Plath
HarperCollins Publishers 2005
ISBN 9780060732608

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 The Craft of Poetry

The Craft of Poetry (craft/workshop)
IMF 52600 The Craft of Poetry

Instructor: Anothai Kaewkaen, Guest Writer
AKaewkaen@lindenwood.edu

This quarter, in conjunction with the International Office at Lindenwood University, we welcome Thai Kaewkaen to our summer faculty as a guest writer. Thai's bio can be read HERE.

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Back to and Beyond the Basics: Working In and Out of Traditional Forms

“The revolution is over,” write Phillip Dacey and David Jauss, editors of Strong Measures: Contemporary American Poetry in Traditional Forms. The free verse revolution of the last century, with the innovative, experimental, and avant-garde movements it produced, they say, “has long since become the fashion.” As a result, and especially over the past two decades, formal verse has emerged from the woodworks and once more into the pages of mainstream literary publications throughout the country. Now more than ever, there is an interest in received forms and traditional techniques—but adapted to meet the demands of today's living language.

However, the hegemony of free verse over the past several decades still remains with us. As a result, whole swathes of the poetic community feel out of touch with basic elements of prosody—thereby missing important tools in their artistic repertoires. Additionally, poets who practice writing in traditional forms can feel alienated among peers who either have “no taste” for traditional verse or have never been trained to read it. This class is designed to benefit both types of students.

In this course, students will survey received forms from both in and out of the English-language tradition, working with and against them to produce new poems for submission in journals and contests. We will read several works of contemporary formal poetry to see how poets today are making old forms new, as well as revisit old favorites from our literary heritage. Finally, we'll analyze the place that formal poetry maintains among the plurality of poetic practices in America today.

TEXTBOOK:
Measure literary journal, volume 8.1
Students can purchase volume 8.1 of Measure conveniently on Amazon HERE. If that link doesn't work, you can access it via the Measure Press Back Issues page here. Simply scroll down and find the correct issue (8.1), then click "Order Now." It is the third from the top with the brown cover and image of a white-bricked building with green dome. Please keep in mind that it could take 2-3 weeks to ship, so plan accordingly.

SMR15 International Poetry

International Poetry (literature/craft)
IMF 52702 Selected Emphases in Poetry: International Poetry

Instructor: Scott Berzon
SBerzon@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Students will analyze and respond to the works of non-American-born poets, both in terms of content and craft. Each week the class will focus on a particular region of the world so that exposure to international poets ranges widely from Central America to Asia, from Eastern Europe to Africa. The final paper for the course asks students to choose a particular poet encountered over the quarter and write critically about the larger scope of that poet's work.  

TEXTBOOK:
The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry
Ilya Kaminsky and Susan Harris
Ecco, Imprint of Harper Collins 2010
ISBN 9780061583247

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 Ekphrastic Poetry

Ekphrastic Poetry (craft/workshop)
IMF 52101 Focused Poetry Workshop: Ekphrastic Poetry

Instructor: Eve Jones
EJones@lindenwood.edu

IMPORTANT: Read the full First Assignment for all online classes HERE—includes start date.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The line between visual art and writing is a wonderfully blurred thing. Traditional ekphrasis is the art of description: what does this painting look like in words? Writers across time and genre have confronted art with language. In this course we'll be reading, writing, and exploring ekphrastic poetry in a deeper, more individual sense: how can we face, respond to, and interpret a piece of visual art using words? What conversation can we have with it? In what way(s) is our literary response dependent on perception? We'll be examining an array of visual art (paintings, sculpture, etc.) and writing in response to each, and we'll be reading multiple examples of ekphrastic poetry, classical and contemporary, to broaden our understanding of its possibilities.

TEXTBOOK:
Art and Artists: Poems
Emily Fragos
Everyman's Library 2012
ISBN 9780307959386

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 Fiction Cluster

Fiction Cluster
On-Campus Cluster (9 credit hours)

Instructor: Mark George
MGeorge@lindenwood.edu

Meeting Day: Thursday

Class Location: LU Cultural Center (room TBA)

First Class Meeting: Thurs. July 9, 6pm-10pm, LU Cultural Center (room TBA)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
No one begins writing stories because they are fascinated by the technical intricacies of literary fiction writing. We become writers because we love the mystery and power of our favorite stories and recognize within ourselves the capacity to create our own narratives and share the fruits of our own imagination. Most of us start writing strictly by instinct but sooner or later we discover that there is more to being a fiction writer than simply sitting down and letting stories flow from our imagination straight onto the page. Nothing in a successful story happens by accident and the choices we must make while writing are never as easy as they seem at first glance.

In this course, we will utilize Janet Burroway's fine craft textbook read and analyze some of the best literary short stories published in the last several decades along with Michael Chabon's novel Wonderboys, focusing on the specific craft elements, large and small, that make them so effective. We will attempt to make sense of the dizzying array of stylistic and technical choices faced during the writing process. We will also engage the broader cultural and philosophical currents that continue to shape both writer and reader in the twenty-first century. The class will culminate in a traditional writing workshop where one original short story from each person will be discussed and critiqued in-depth.

TEXTBOOKS (3):
Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft
Janet Burroway
Longman 2014
ISBN 9780321923165

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction
Lex Williford and Michael Martone
Touchstone 2007
ISBN 9781416532279

Wonderboys
Michael Chabone
Random House Trade Paperbacks
Reprint 2008
ISBN 9780812979213

FIRST ASSIGNMENT: 
Please read Stuart Dybek's short story "We Didn't" from the Scribner Anthology and take note of any moments where Dybek's craft catches your eye. An example of this would be the author's deliberate repetition of the title multiple times in both the beginning and end of the piece. I found that element to be very effective as a bookend to this bittersweet story of two frustrated young lovers. Even though the story is fairly straightforward in its subject matter, its delivery is both subtle and complex.  Prepare 1-2 two pages of thoughts on the specific craft techniques you can identify in Dybek's story and be prepared to discuss them with the class. 

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

SMR15 Adv Scriptwriting Cluster

Advanced Scriptwriting Cluster
On-Campus Cluster (9 credit hours)

Instructor: Peter Carlos
PCarlos@lindenwood.edu

Meeting Day: Monday

Class Location: Scheidegger Center room 2060

First Class Meeting: Mon. July 6, 6pm-10pm, Scheidegger Center (room TBA)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In Advanced Scriptwriting, students will learn how to improve character dialogue and subtext, as well as strengthening their screenplays’ formats.

*TEXTBOOK:
Save the Cat
Blake Snyder 
Michael Wiese Productions
ISBN 978193907001

*Please note that this is the only text for the on-campus cluster. An additional text may listed in the student portal for one of the course numbers in this cluster; however, that book is only being used by the online scriptwriting class. The on-campus cluster requires only Save the Cat.

FIRST ASSIGNMENT:
1. Read the content at the link below:
http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/Catalog/uploadedFiles/Content/BSM/Product/TOC/Dick_Anatomy_Ch6.pdf

2. Students should write a two to three-page essay (double-spaced) on “Subtext in Films.”

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

Guest Writer Thai Kaewkaen

Anothai Kaewkaen was alumnus of the year for the Thailand-United States Education Foundation (Fulbright Thailand) in 2011. During his tenure as researcher in languages and literature, he was hosted by Thailand's College of Dramatic Arts under the Ministry of Culture, for whom he translated programs and MC'd cultural events. Winner of Lunch Ticket's inaugural Gabo Prize for Translation and Multilingual Texts in 2014, Anothai's translations, essays, and original poems have appeared in several journals, with more forthcoming in 2015 in Unsplendid, Waxwing, Reunion: The Dallas Review, and The Berkeley Poetry Review. Anothai received his MFA in Writing from Lindenwood University, where he worked with Dr. Michael Castro, St. Louis' first poet laureate.

Thai will teach an online LU MFA class in Summer Quarter 2015 in conjunction with the International Office at Lindenwood University.

First Assignment for All Online Classes--Summer 2015

First date that students may access classes on Blackboard: Sunday, July 12

MFA classes will be available to students to view on this day (class shells may appear in Blackboard before this date, but they are not ready for student view until Sunday 7/12). You may look over assignments and class content to ensure that you wish to remain in the class. If you decide to drop the class, do NOT post in Blackboard at all, as that counts as attendance per university policy, and you would be charged a portion of tuition for dropping after attending/posting. To drop a class, email the program director at bmead@lindenwood.edu.

First assignment post (to confirm attendance) due date: Monday, July 13, by 11:59pm CST

This assignment simply requires you to post your name in the First Assignment discussion forum as verification to the instructor that you wish to remain in the class and be counted as attended for week 1. Instructors will enter first week attendance according to posts made by 11:59pm CST on Monday, July 13. If you post in the First Assignment forum by then, you will be marked as Present. If you do not post by then, you will be marked as Absent. Attendance must be entered early in week 1 due to university policy and because first day attendance impacts the refund process for financial aid and student loans.

Class Requirements and other assignments due during Week 1 (Mon. July 13 - Sun. July 19: See Week 1 folder in Blackboard

Each instructor will have his or her own additional assignments due during Week 1. Along with posting your name in the First Assignment discussion forum to confirm that you wish to remain in the class, you must click on Class Requirements in the left menu column and thoroughly read all information contained there. Then you will click on the Week 1 folder to read instructions for the remaining coursework and due dates during Week 1. If you have any problems navigating through the class on Blackboard, contact your instructor or the program director (bmead@lindenwood.edu).

Weekly Coursework and Participation Requirements

Each week during the quarter, you will click on WEEKLY ASSIGNMENTS and then on the appropriate week’s folder to view the assignments and due dates for that week. You are required to participate on Blackboard a minimum of three times per week for each class you are enrolled in. See Blackboard for detailed information on the attendance/participation policy and grading criteria. 

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).

Instructions for Logging in to Blackboard for Online Classes:
  • Go to www.lindenwood.edu
  • Hover your mouse over Blackboard in the white bar at the top of the screen
  • Click on Access Blackboard
  • Log in with the same user ID and password you use for your Lionmail account. If you have not activated your Lionmail account, go to www.lindenwood.edu, hover over Email at the top of the screen, and click on Find Your Username; follow the instructions to get your user ID and password. If you have any problems, email the director at bmead@lindenwood.edu or the Help Desk at helpdesk@lindenwood.edu
  • Once you are logged in, click on your course name to enter the class site
  • To access Blackboard resources, click on the online support links at the bottom of the Log In page, or click on the Help menu button in your class shell

Registration Instructions for Summer Quarter 2015 MFA Students

Steps for MFA student registration:

Review the SMR QTR 15 MFA Class Schedule HERE. Scroll down to read all class info for each class that interests you (instructor course description, class type, textbook info, first assignment for clusters). Online students must also read the Online Class First Assignment post HERE and note the start date and important information for the first week of class.

As soon as you have decided on the class(es) you would like to take for summer quarter, email the program director at bmead@lindenwood.edu. List the cluster/classes you would like to be enrolled in. Online students may want to include one or two back-up classes in case all spots have been filled in their first-choice classes. Within one week, you will receive a confirmation email for your reserved classes.

Spots will be reserved in classes in the order of emails received. To have the best chance of taking your preferred classes, email Beth as early as possible after receiving the registration info email. It is fine to make changes later by emailing Beth with updated info (dependent on available spaces in requested classes). Classes may fill quickly, so be sure to email Beth as soon as you have decided on your class choices to reserve a spot. Beth will maintain wait lists for all classes, and classes that fill quickly may be offered again in fall or winter. 

While students may email Beth with class choices beginning May 11, registration does not begin until May 25. During the week of May 25, Beth will enroll all students who have reserved spots in classes, and she will send a confirmation email to all students after they have been registered. 

If you have any questions, contact Beth at bmead@lindenwood.edu or 636-949-4524.

SMR15 MFA Class Schedule & Course Info

On-campus clusters begin the week of July 6 (7/6 for Scriptwriting and 7/9 for Fiction). Online classes begin Monday, July 13. Summer quarter ends September 26.

Registration instructions are available HERE

Note on texts: MFA textbooks are usually available at bookstores such as Barnes & Noble, as well as through online sites such as Amazon.com (used copies are often available). E-books are acceptable. A limited number of textbooks are also available at full price through the LU Spirit Shoppe (via Lindenwood's website).


SUMMER QUARTER 2015 CLASS SCHEDULE (scroll down for individual course info):

On-Campus Clusters (9 credit hours):

Advanced Scriptwriting Cluster—Monday—Peter Carlos

Fiction Cluster—Thursday—Mark George


Online Classes (3 credit hours):

POETRY COURSE OPTIONS:
Ekphrastic Poetry—Eve Jones (craft/workshop) -- FULL
International Poetry—Scott Berzon (literature/craft)
The Craft of Poetry—Thai Kaewkaen, Guest Writer (craft/workshop) -- FULL
Plath's Later Ariel Poems & the Tarot—Julia Gordon-Bramer (literature/craft)
   This class will cover the second half of Fixed Stars Govern a Life: Decoding Sylvia Plath, volume one, featuring Plath's Ariel poems #12 ("Elm") through 22 ("The Courage of Shutting-Up").

FICTION COURSE OPTIONS:
Fiction Writing Workshop—Tony D'Souza (workshop) -- FULL
Adv Studies in Contemporary Fiction—Wm. Anthony Connolly (craft/writing exercises)
Young Adult Fiction Workshop—Mary Anderson (workshop/craft) -- FULL
The Prose Collection: Henry Miller—Kelli Allen (literature) -- FULL

NONFICTION COURSE OPTIONS:
The Lyric Essay—Eve Jones (craft/workshop) -- FULL
The Personal Essay—David Hollingsworth (craft/workshop)
The Prose Collection: David Foster Wallace—Kelli Allen (literature) -- FULL

SCRIPTWRITING COURSE OPTION:
Focused Scriptwriting Workshop—Zachary Vickers (workshop)

JOURNAL EDITING* COURSE OPTIONS:
The Literary JournalBeth Mead
  • It is highly recommended that all MFA students enroll in at least one Literary Journal class during the program. This class gives students the chance to be on the other side of the submission process and is very useful as a writer--and it also allows students to list an Editorial Assistant credit on their CV/resume.
  • Journal editing emphasis options for summer: Fiction, Poetry, or Prose Poetry
  • Students in literary journal classes read, discuss, and vote on submissions to The Lindenwood Review. This class includes other types of assignments but does not include a creative writing component. See course description for full details.

GRADUATE THESIS--final quarter in program:
Thesis Registration Instructions
Full Guidelines

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, TEXTBOOKS, & FIRST ASSIGNMENTS:

Advanced Scriptwriting ClusterMondayPeter Carlos

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In Advanced Scriptwriting, students will learn how to improve character dialogue and subtext, as well as strengthening their screenplays’ formats.

TEXTBOOK:
Save the Cat
Blake Snyder 
Michael Wiese Productions
ISBN 978193907001

FIRST ASSIGNMENT:
1. Read the content at the link below:
http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/Catalog/uploadedFiles/Content/BSM/Product/TOC/Dick_Anatomy_Ch6.pdf

2. Students should write a two to three-page essay (double-spaced) on “Subtext in Films.”


Fiction ClusterThursdayMark George

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
No one begins writing stories because they are fascinated by the technical intricacies of literary fiction writing. We become writers because we love the mystery and power of our favorite stories and recognize within ourselves the capacity to create our own narratives and share the fruits of our own imagination. Most of us start writing strictly by instinct but sooner or later we discover that there is more to being a fiction writer than simply sitting down and letting stories flow from our imagination straight onto the page. Nothing in a successful story happens by accident and the choices we must make while writing are never as easy as they seem at first glance.

In this course, we will utilize Janet Burroway's fine craft textbook read and analyze some of the best literary short stories published in the last several decades along with Michael Chabon's novel Wonderboys, focusing on the specific craft elements, large and small, that make them so effective. We will attempt to make sense of the dizzying array of stylistic and technical choices faced during the writing process. We will also engage the broader cultural and philosophical currents that continue to shape both writer and reader in the twenty-first century. The class will culminate in a traditional writing workshop where one original short story from each person will be discussed and critiqued in-depth.

TEXTBOOKS (3):
Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft
Janet Burroway
Longman 2014
ISBN 9780321923165

The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction
Lex Williford and Michael Martone
Touchstone 2007
ISBN 9781416532279

Wonderboys
Michael Chabone
Random House Trade Paperbacks
Reprint 2008
ISBN 9780812979213

FIRST ASSIGNMENT: 
Please read Stuart Dybek's short story "We Didn't" from the Scribner Anthology and take note of any moments where Dybek's craft catches your eye. An example of this would be the author's deliberate repetition of the title multiple times in both the beginning and end of the piece. I found that element to be very effective as a bookend to this bittersweet story of two frustrated young lovers. Even though the story is fairly straightforward in its subject matter, its delivery is both subtle and complex.  Prepare 1-2 two pages of thoughts on the specific craft techniques you can identify in Dybek's story and be prepared to discuss them with the class. 


ONLINE CLASSES:
The First Assignment for all online classes is available HERE.

Ekphrastic PoetryEve Jones (craft/workshop)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The line between visual art and writing is a wonderfully blurred thing. Traditional ekphrasis is the art of description: what does this painting look like in words? Writers across time and genre have confronted art with language. In this course we'll be reading, writing, and exploring ekphrastic poetry in a deeper, more individual sense: how can we face, respond to, and interpret a piece of visual art using words? What conversation can we have with it? In what way(s) is our literary response dependent on perception? We'll be examining an array of visual art (paintings, sculpture, etc.) and writing in response to each, and we'll be reading multiple examples of ekphrastic poetry, classical and contemporary, to broaden our understanding of its possibilities.

TEXTBOOK:
Art and Artists: Poems
Emily Fragos
Everyman's Library 2012
ISBN 9780307959386


International PoetryScott Berzon (literature/craft)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Students will analyze and respond to the works of non-American-born poets, both in terms of content and craft. Each week the class will focus on a particular region of the world so that exposure to international poets ranges widely from Central America to Asia, from Eastern Europe to Africa. The final paper for the course asks students to choose a particular poet encountered over the quarter and write critically about the larger scope of that poet's work.  

TEXTBOOK:
The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry
Ilya Kaminsky and Susan Harris
Ecco, Imprint of Harper Collins 2010
ISBN 9780061583247


The Craft of PoetryThai Kaewkaen, Guest Writer (craft/workshop)
This quarter, in conjunction with the International Office at Lindenwood University, we welcome Thai Kaewkaen to our summer faculty as a guest writer. Thai's bio can be read HERE

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Back to and Beyond the Basics: Working In and Out of Traditional Forms

“The revolution is over,” write Phillip Dacey and David Jauss, editors of Strong Measures: Contemporary American Poetry in Traditional Forms. The free verse revolution of the last century, with the innovative, experimental, and avant-garde movements it produced, they say, “has long since become the fashion.” As a result, and especially over the past two decades, formal verse has emerged from the woodworks and once more into the pages of mainstream literary publications throughout the country. Now more than ever, there is an interest in received forms and traditional techniques—but adapted to meet the demands of today's living language.

However, the hegemony of free verse over the past several decades still remains with us. As a result, whole swathes of the poetic community feel out of touch with basic elements of prosody—thereby missing important tools in their artistic repertoires. Additionally, poets who practice writing in traditional forms can feel alienated among peers who either have “no taste” for traditional verse or have never been trained to read it. This class is designed to benefit both types of students.

In this course, students will survey received forms from both in and out of the English-language tradition, working with and against them to produce new poems for submission in journals and contests. We will read several works of contemporary formal poetry to see how poets today are making old forms new, as well as revisit old favorites from our literary heritage. Finally, we'll analyze the place that formal poetry maintains among the plurality of poetic practices in America today.

TEXTBOOK:
Measure literary journal, volume 8.1
Students can purchase volume 8.1 of Measure conveniently on Amazon HERE. If that link doesn't work, you can access it via the Measure Press Back Issues page here. Simply scroll down and find the correct issue (8.1), then click "Order Now." It is the third from the top with the brown cover and image of a white-bricked building with green dome. Please keep in mind that it could take 2-3 weeks to ship, so plan accordingly.


Plath's Later Ariel Poems & the TarotJulia Gordon-Bramer (literature/craft)
NOTE: There is no prerequisite for this class; it is open to both students who have taken Plath & the Tarot (studying earlier poems in Ariel) and to students who have not taken that class.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is intended for students who seek to understand the meanings and structure of Sylvia Plath's Ariel poems; to understand, identify and interpret symbolism; and to gain an introductory knowledge of the basic tenets of tarot and mysticism in written creative expression. Students will have weekly written responses, class discussion, presentations and individual creative work inspired by Plath's mystic models.

TEXTBOOKS (2):
Fixed Stars Govern a Life: Decoding Sylvia Plath, volume I
Julia Gordon Bramer
Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2015
ISBN 9781622880645

Ariel: The Restored Edition
Sylvia Plath
HarperCollins Publishers 2005
ISBN 9780060732608


Fiction Writing WorkshopTony D'Souza (workshop)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The blank page...what can be more terrifying for a writer? We all know the feeling of starting something new, of not knowing exactly where it is going to go. Isn't it nice to remember that every great work of literature began that same way?

In this workshop-driven fiction writing course, we will discuss process, technique tips, and share with one another what we do when we're staring at a blank page. Then we'll give each other feedback once we've begun to fill a few of them. This course is open to all styles of fiction, from literary, to speculative, to fast-paced genre. We'll read great short stories from Rick Moody, Vladimir Nabokov, Zora Neale Hurston and others. Ultimately, we want to show our fiction to the world and will work on writing query letters and figure out how to pitch to agents. It all starts the same way, so let's begin. 

NO TEXTBOOK IS REQUIRED FOR THIS WORKSHOP CLASS.


Adv Studies in Contemporary FictionWm. Anthony Connolly (craft/writing exercises)
NOTE: It is not required to have taken Fundamentals of Contemporary Fiction before enrolling in this class; however, it is a good follow-up class for those who have taken it.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This eleven-week course is for the skilled fiction writer who wants to up their game. Each week the course will offer a new craft technique to produce prose with publication as the goal. Advanced Studies in Contemporary Fiction prepares students to work within historical and current creative writing practices and provides a supportive environment to refine their short stories, novellas or novels.

TEXTBOOK:
How Fiction Works
James Wood
Picador 2009
ISBN 9780312428471


Young Adult Fiction WorkshopMary Anderson (workshop/craft)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This Young Adult Fiction Workshop launches from the banks of best-known favorites like Harry Potter and The Hunger Games. Using rough drafts of your novel chapters as our focus, we will explore—through discussions, journal revisions, and workshop critique—the ingredients that make your chapters YA, in terms of point of view, subject matter, and voice. You will write up to three chapters of an original YA or crossover novel along with a partial chapter outline for your book in progress. We will read excerpts from works by J.D. Salinger, J.K. Rowlings, Curtis Sittenfeld, Madeline L’Engle, and Scott Westerfeld. 

The best YA novels involve fully realized characters and a level of emotional complexity that appeal to today’s young person. You will attempt to conjure swiftly moving plots that speak to a teen’s unique world-view. Dare to invent a combination unlike anything already happening in literary fiction today.

TEXTBOOK:
The Complete Guide to Writing for Young Adults
Gabrielle Harbowy
Dragon Moon Press 2014
ISBN 9781897492819


The Prose Collection: Henry Miller—Kelli Allen (literature)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In considering what it means to be a writer in a world ever more concerned with itself as a populace of individuals bent on moving as a whole, where and how do we find our “voice?” Henry Miller, in his stunning collection of essays and stories, Stand Still Like The Hummingbird, suggests that only “the artist has the power to open man up, to set free the imagination? The others—priest, teacher, saint, statesman, warrior—hold us to the path of history. They keep us chained to the rock, that the vultures may eat out our hearts. It is the artist who has the courage to go against the crowd; he is the unrecognized "hero of our time"—and of all time.” Miller asserts that it is only through language that we learn to recognize ourselves as heroic, as worthy of attention on the page. This course will take a close, critical look at how Miller structures his own art and how he found the courage to express his opinions on modern art, on the classics, on love, money, sex, and the art of storytelling. You will be asked to compose two literary essays of your own which will be workshopped during the quarter. We will discuss material and topics that will sometimes feel difficult and controversial. Come into this course space open and ready for lively and vital conversation. 

TEXTBOOK:
Stand Still Like the Hummingbird
Henry Miller
New Directions 1962
ISBN 9780811203227


The Lyric Essay—Eve Jones (craft/workshop)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Just when you think that you, reader or writer, have a handle on what the lyric essay is, it slips away and turns into something else. Meet it for coffee when it's prose, but understand it's also having a drink with someone else across the street as poetry. Here is what you know for sure: it's honest, it's true, it's surprising, its hair is a little messy, it is at once lyrically gorgeous and precisely organized, and it prefers the scenic route through the body, the past, the self, the external world. Examples of challenging & excellent contemporary lyric essayists include Anne Carson, Michael Ondaatje, Sarah Manguso, and John D'Agata.

TEXTBOOK:
Writing Creative NonFiction
Carolyn Forche and Philip Gerard
Story Press 2001
ISBN 9781884910500


The Personal Essay—David Hollingsworth (craft/workshop)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will focus on the wellspring of memory and reflection and the employment of narrative in creative nonfiction. Students will discuss a variety of personal essays, noting the use of voice, character development, sense of place and time, and narrative arc, and will write their own creative nonfiction pieces for workshop.

TEXTBOOK:
Tell It Slant
Miller and Paola
McGraw-Hill
9780071781770


The Prose Collection: David Foster Wallace—Kelli Allen (literature)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In David Foster Wallace’s Consider the Lobster and Other Essays we will learn why there is gravitas in the porn industry’s annual awards banquet, why Kafka was secretly hilarious, what really happens when we cook a lobster, and how John McCain’s passion for politics is strangely, violently tender, among other oddities and profundities. We will explore the magic of the extended footnote and what it means to let poetry into journalism and essay. This particular collection of essays offers a fractaled glimpse into the creative process and observations employed by arguably the most exciting nonfiction/fiction writer of a generation. DFW tells us “The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways, every day.” It is this freedom that he longs for in his essays, and the freedom he hopes to offer through exposing some of the weirdest, most vital aspects of being alive in a community of equally bizarre and fragile humans. In this course we will examine the universe through DFW’s lenses and then apply our own in mini-workshops and discussion. The ride will be fast, and strange, and sometimes very, very difficult (footnotes galore), but worth every moment.

TEXTBOOK:
Consider the Lobster
David Foster Wallace
Bay Back Books 2007
ISBN 9780316013321


Focused Scriptwriting Workshop—Zachary Vickers (workshop)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Focused Scriptwriting will isolate narrative elements through the construction of high-quality scenes. The course will look at examples of scene from film, focusing on the development of character, setting, tone, subtext, and other important elements. We will also discuss how to show and tell simultaneously—creating visual subtext as well as traditional subtext via dialogue in order to create efficient and urgent moments while moving the story forward. Students will also be expected to write their own scenes—whether self-contained shorts, or a scene for something larger—which will then be workshopped and revised.

TEXTBOOK:
Screenplay: The Foundations of Scriptwriting
Syd Field
Delta 2005
ISBN 9780385339032


The Literary Journal—Beth Mead
Three sections available for summer: Fiction, Poetry, or Prose Poetry

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Students enrolled in summer journal editing classes will read submissions to issue 6 of The Lindenwood Review, discuss them with the class, and vote on them for publication; students will be listed as editorial assistants in TLR. Students in the Prose Poetry class will help determine the winner of the Prose Poetry Contest. (Summer journal editing classes will cover submissions received from June through August; fall journal editing classes will include submissions of personal essays, fiction, and poetry received from September through November.) Additional coursework includes describing and analyzing your personal aesthetic as a reader and writer (to clarify your perspective as you vote on submissions), as well as researching and presenting a literary journal to the class (students enrolled in more than one section will research a different journal for each class). In addition, the publication process will be discussed, and students will be required to submit their own original work to an approved publication by the end of the quarter. Students may enroll in up to four sections of journal editing classes during their time in the program, but it is recommended that no more than two sections are taken in a single quarter.

TEXTBOOK:
Issue 5 of The Lindenwood Review
Please order the issue by mail if possible, at the reduced rate of $5, to help support the MFA program (online orders are available for $7 here from the bookstore but do not support our program). To order by mail, make your check payable to Lindenwood University and mail to: Beth Mead, The Lindenwood Review, 400 N. Kingshighway, St. Charles, MO 63301. 

Additionally, students will purchase (or access online) one issue of an approved literary journal for class presentations.